Yearly Review

A review of last year and plans for next.

Success

  • Run: As I’ve written before, this year has been a spectacular success with running. I’ve run 800 km and I’ve just bought a cycle. Here’s to more exercise! This years goals are 2000 km of running, 3000 km of cycling, and to finish one full marathon.
  • Read non-fiction: I’ve read a few non-fiction books so far and they’ve been enlightening. This year, I’ll try to add reviews of books I read. I’ll be picking up a lot of books based on recommendation from Farnam Street Blog. This year’s goal is simple, for every 3 non-fiction books, I can read one fiction 🙂

Not Quite Success

  • Learn C and JavaScript: I didn’t manage the time to squeeze this into my schedule. I did manage to build some things with JavaScript, so it’s a partial win. I will most probably abandon this in favour of learning Rust or Go.
  • Cut down servers: When you need automation for personal servers, you know it has gone too far. I’m back down to just two servers these days. This is how far I can go without causing serious outage to how I do things.
  • Study: I’m still yet to complete a MOOC course successfully. This one is a challenge for this year to go along with my actual studies.
India Gate, my favorite part of Delhi

New Challenges

  • Accounting: Last year, I finally got down to getting a regular accounting habit. This year, I’d like to push that to keeping accounts and sticking to budgets.
  • Cooking: I’ve been trying (and failing) to cook more and eat restaurant food less. I will be tackling this in a slow and steady manner 🙂
  • Android Development: I’ve been using Android for a while and I haven’t yet build anything for it. This year, I’ll be experimenting on building a few apps for personal use, nothing big for sure.

Image Credit: Delhi, India Gate by Arian Zwegers on Flickr.

Locked In

Last week, I had the funniest thing happen to me. The maid came home when I was cooking. She was pretty distracted and when she left, she bolted the door from…

Last week, I had the funniest thing happen to me. The maid came home when I was cooking. She was pretty distracted and when she left, she bolted the door from outside. I work from home, so there’s often no need to step out of the house for the entire day. I didn’t discover that I was locked in until the next morning when I tried to step out to keep the garbage bin out.

I didn’t want to bother anyone since I had food in the house and there was nothing I needed urgently. Of course, I understand this is a fire hazard, but I figured the maid would come later in the day and unlock me. I later called her and realized she wasn’t coming. I had to call my significant other to open the door. Goes on to say, sometimes the Princess needs to rescue the Prince from the locked tower (I do live on the 4th floor and there’s no elevator).

Remembering Michael

Michael Bauer, a good friend and a colleague at Open Knowledge for nearly 2 years passed away a month ago. I’m still finding it hard to process that he’s passed away. He’d congratulated me on my run just the day before. And…

Michael Bauer, a good friend and a colleague at Open Knowledge for nearly 2 years passed away a month ago. I’m still finding it hard to process that he’s passed away. He’d congratulated me on my run just the day before. And this is the final tweet from his Twitter account.

I met Michael for the first time in winter of 2013. It was my first summit after starting at Open Knowledge. Michael, Friedrich, Lucy, Tryggvi, I, and a few others were holed up in Rufus’ kitchen getting briefed on Openspending from Friedrich. Over the years, we’ve worked together to deliver trainings and we met each other at the Open Knowledge summits and events. I sat through one of Michael’s trainings last year in Tanzania on cleaning data. I learned quite a lot about cleaning up data from him that day. He got the entire room comfortable about learning new things. I could see their joy in understanding how to use the right tools.

Michael, during the training in Tanzania

After Michael left Open Knowledge, we kept in touch on #running on irc.freenode.net and Twitter. I’d just started running this year and he encouraged me to do longer distances. As I continue running, I’ll surely be thinking of Michael every day.

At the last summit we both attended in Cambridge, Michael had brought Pink sunglasses and he coaxed me into having this hilarious picture taken. I miss Michael’s infectious energy and silliness.

Me with Michael's Pink sun glasses

Good Bye Open Knowledge, Hello Scary World

I’ve been with Open Knowledge since October 2, 2012. It’s been 2 years and 8 months. Back then, I had just lost an opportunity to work at Mozilla with James Socol. I wasn’t sure what I wanted to do, but Open Knowledge…

I’ve been with Open Knowledge since October 2, 2012. It’s been 2 years and 8 months. Back then, I had just lost an opportunity to work at Mozilla with James Socol. I wasn’t sure what I wanted to do, but Open Knowledge looked very attractive. Open Knowledge has connections to Mozilla and Canonical – The two open source communities I’ve worked with heavily. In the last few years, I’ve worked on crowdcrafting.org, openspending.org, and CKAN; conducted trainings in 2 countries; and visited London, Cambridge, Nairobi, Dar es Salaam, and Berlin for work. It’s been a fantastic few years. And it’s time to move on.

Good Bye!

From 22nd July, I will no longer be a full-time staff at Open Knowledge. I’ll be around as a freelancer to help transition my position and I’ll be available as a freelancer. I’m already setup to do business and I’m excited to do interesting work. I’m currently working with Miranj, Vidhi, and Guiding Tech!

If you want a short-term python developer/linux sysadmin or some custom CKAN development done, please get in touch with me.

The Modern Lab Reports

Yesterday morning, I went to the local lab to get a few follow-up blood tests..

Yesterday morning, I went to the local lab to get a few follow-up blood tests done. I was very amused at the system this particular chain of labs had. They had small franchisee collection centers. I paid the collection center and they sent my samples onwards to a central processing lab. When collecting my samples, they took my phone number, my name, and the referring doctor’s name in addition to the name of the tests I wanted.

In the evening, I got an SMS with my report ID and a password. I just had to visit their website and I could download a PDF report of my lab report. Truly, we’re living in the future!